Sunday, November 24, 2013

Nikon COOLPIX S6500 specs and in-depth review

<Nikon D5300 Discountimg src="">


By Alan Ng Posted 24 Nov 2013, 23:31

If you are looking for a new camera to buy this month and also want to buy a recognized brand, we may have a good contender for you. The Nikon COOLPIX S6500 camera features specs that could tempt you into a purchase this month, especially if retailers opt to sell this for a low price.

While smartphone cameras are obviously getting very popular in today's world, sometimes you just can't beat the real thing. The Nikon COOLPIX S6500 is part of Nikon's brand new camera series and it features a 16 megapixel camera sensor.

It also supports full HD video recording, with 1080p resolution at 30FPS for those that like taking videos. You'll be able to view your photos and videos on a 3-inch TFT quality display, and capture up to 7 images at once with a handy multi-shot feature.

Zooming in for those up-close moments will be a breeze too, with a 12x optical Zoom-NIKKOR ED glass lens built into the camera - after all, smartphone camera zooming continues to disappoint time and time again.

You can view full specs over at Nikon's website here, also confirming that the COOLPIX S6500 is available in a variety of colors. For a more in-depth look at the camera though, you'll find this Nikon COOLPIX S6500 review that we have added below very helpful.

Are you leaning towards picking up a new camera this month after being disappointed with your current smartphone camera? Give us your thoughts on this model below.

You can add us to your circle on Google+, follow us on Twitter, join the photo community on Pinterest, or like our Facebook page to keep updated on all the latest news.

Source: Product-reviews

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Nikon Releases D5300 Digital SLR Camera

<Nikon D5300 Discountp>/PRNewswire/ --

The new Nikon D5300 with built-in Wi-Fi® and GPS makes it simple to share high quality images

Nikon Singapore Pte Ltd is pleased to announce the release of the D5300, Nikon's latest entry-level DX-format digital SLR camera.

(Photo: )

The D5300 offers an effective pixel count of 24.2-million pixels and is equipped with a Nikon DX-format CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, as well as the new high-performance EXPEED 4 image-processing engine. It is Nikon's first digital SLR camera to offer built-in wireless LAN (Wi-Fi®) and GPS functions, so users can easily share high-quality images captured with the D5300 and NIKKOR lenses via a smart device. These functions also allow users to look back on routes taken on vacation or with outdoor activities using a log feature that is part of the built-in GPS function.

The D5300 is designed with a structure made of a new material to bring about a smaller and lighter body while maintaining the necessary strength and durability. The camera is also equipped with a number of features that support various shooting situations, including a 3.2-inch, approximately 1037k-dot vari-angle monitor with a wide viewing angle for shooting from a variety of angles, a full-HD movie recording function that supports recording of smooth 1920 × 1080/60p movies, and a Special Effects mode with nine options that can be applied to photos and movies with shooting for a variety of creative effects.

The Zoom/Focus Assist Lever NAL-1 for exclusive use with NIKKOR lenses will also be released at the same time as the D5300. The NAL-1 is a lever that enables smoother zooming and focusing when attached to the zoom ring or focus ring on a NIKKOR lens and is especially convenient for movie recording.

D5300 Primary Features

1. An effective pixel count of 24.2-million pixels anda Nikon DX-format CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, and the latest image-processing engine, EXPEED 4, for superior image quality and definition

The D5300 offers an effective pixel count of 24.2-million pixels and is equipped with a DX-format CMOS image sensor developed exclusively by Nikon. It supports a broad range of standard sensitivities from ISO 100 to 12800, as well as an additional expansion of up to ISO 25600 equivalent (Hi 1) for high-definition images exhibiting very little noise with shooting at a broad range of sensitivities. In addition, the high-speed performance of the latest image-processing engine, EXPEED 4, optimized for high-performance digital SLR cameras, provides superior results with noise reduction (NR), auto white balance, color reproduction characteristics, tone processing, and image quality at high sensitivities. The absence of a low-pass filter maximizes the superior resolution of the high pixel count and rendering capabilities of NIKKOR lenses.

2. Built-in Wi-Fi for transferring high-quality images to a smart device for ease of sharing

As Nikon's first digital SLR camera equipped with a built-in Wi-Fi function, high-quality images with an effective pixel count of 24.2-million pixels captured from a variety of angles using the flexible vari-angle monitor can be transferred to a smart device for sharing with others[*1]. This expands the ways in which images are enjoyed after they are taken by enabling immediate image transfer for sharing photos with family and friends via blogs or social networking sites anytime, anywhere.

    Transfer function: Images captured by the D5300, or already saved to a memory card inserted in the D5300, can be transferred to a smart device over a wireless connection. These images can then be viewed in the smart device display, or uploaded to a blog or social networking site. In addition, the size at which images are transferred to a smart device can be selected from two options to fit the storage capacity of the smart device.
    Remote shooting function: The camera's live view shooting display can be shown on the display of the smart device in real time, allowing users to accurately frame photos and predict results with remote control while shooting[*2].
    Manual upload function: Users can select images to be uploaded to a smart device using the D5300 monitor display. In situations or environments that do not sufficiently support immediate image upload, or when a smart device is not readily available, the camera can be used to specify images, and image file size, to be uploaded to the smart device at a later time.

[*1] The Wireless Mobile Utility app must first be installed on the smart device (the app can be downloaded free of charge from the smart device's app store).

[*2] Effective only when AF-area mode is set to "Normal-area AF" or "Wide-area AF".

3. A built-in GPS function that records location data and tracks movement

The D5300 is Nikon's first digital SLR camera with a built-in GPS function, enabling recording of location data (longitude, latitude, altitude) with images. It also works seamlessly with ViewNX 2, NIKON IMAGE SPACE, and commercial mapping software enables display of images where they were captured on maps, as well as sharing of images with location data. The A-GPS function also makes detection of location data smoother. This capability allows users to look back on memories or track their movement, on vacations or with outdoor activities by shooting location, and date and time of capture.

4. Designed using a new material for a smaller and lighter body that is strong and durable

The D5300 is designed using a new material. As the camera cover and body are formed with a rigid, integrated structure, there are fewer joints. This enables a smaller and lighter camera with a width of 125 mm, height of 98 mm, and depth of 76 mm, and weighing just 530 g[*], all while maintaining the necessary strength and durability.

* Including battery and SD memory card; excluding body cap.

5. A 3.2-inch, 1037k-dot vari-angle LCD monitor with wide viewing angle for simple shooting from any angle

The D5300 features a larger 3.2-inch (approximately 1037k-dot) LCD monitor with wide viewing angle for a crisp and clear display. The side-hinged vari-angle monitor opens from 0 to 180° at the side, and can be rotated up to 90° clockwise and up to 180° counter-clockwise. This enables shooting from a wide variety of angles, from low to high, making even self-portraits possible.

6. D-Movie function for recording full-HD 1920 × 1080 60p movies

The D5300 is equipped with a D-Movie function that supports recording of 1920 × 1080/60p movies. The combination of NIKKOR lenses, a high pixel-count CMOS image sensor unit which does not include an optical low-pass filter, and an effective pixel count of 24.2-million pixels, enables recording of high-definition movies exhibiting superior rendering characteristics. In addition, autofocusing during movie recording is possible using contrast-detect AF. When the focus mode is set to full-time-servo AF (AF-F) and AF-area mode is set to Subject-tracking AF, the camera automatically maintains focus on moving subjects. Manual movie settings are also available, allowing users to choose the desired shutter speed and ISO sensitivity in live view mode and with movie recording. Movie frame rate with full-HD recording can be selected from 24p, 25p, 30p, 50p, and 60p. In addition to recording of high-quality sound via the built-in stereo microphone, the optional Stereo Microphone ME-1 can also be used to record stereo sound.

    Toy Camera Effect: Create photos and movies in which colors have been changed and edges have been shaded so that they appear to have been recorded with a toy camera. Users can adjust the vividness and degree of vignetting (peripheral shading) from three options each to suit their individual preferences.
    HDR Painting[*]: The camera shoots two frames at different exposures and combines them, with processing that changes color tones, for HDR images with a painterly effect.

7. Toy Camera Effect and HDR Painting added to Special Effects mode (total of 9 effects) for more creative expression with still images and movies

The D5300 is equipped with a Special Effects mode, with which effects can be selected and applied with recording of both still images and movies. The effects can also be previewed in the camera monitor in real time before shooting or recording begins. A total of nine special effects are available, including the seven built into the D5200 (Selective Color, Color Sketch, Miniature Effect, Night Vision, Silhouette, High Key, Low Key), as well as the new Toy Camera Effect and HDR Painting*. This allows users to easily utilize dramatic effects like those seen in art and the movies. This mode was incorporated into the D5300 to respond to the creative intent of users who were searching for a way to express their own unique style and creativity.

* HDR Painting cannot be applied to movies. Further, results of the HDR Painting effect cannot be previewed in the camera monitor.

8. Designed with a firm grip using just one hand and available in 3 colors, including a new gray option

The grip on the D5300 is designed to fit comfortably in the palm of the hand for a firm hold using just one hand, making framing via both the optical viewfinder and the monitor's live view display easier. In addition to the popular black and red colors, the D5300 is also available in a new gray option. Metal parts on the D5300, such as the microphone cover and plate over the mode dial, have also been designed with a surface finish that gives the camera an elegant appearance.

About Nikon

Pricing and Availability

The Nikon 5300 will be available in three colors (Black, Red and Gray), starting in November 2013 at the suggested retail price (SRP) of AED 3,999. For more information on the new Nikon D5300 and other Nikon products, please visit

Nikon, At the Heart of the Image. Nikon is the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology and is globally recognised for setting new standards in product design and performance for its award-winning consumer and professional photographic equipment. Nikon Singapore Pte Ltd distributes consumer and professional digital SLR cameras, NKKOR optics, Speedlights and system accessories; Nikon COOLPIX compact digital cameras; Nikon sports optics as well as the Nikon 1 advanced cameras with interchangeable lens system in over 50 countries.

For more information, visit Connect with Nikon and other photographers on Facebook at and get the latest news and information from Twitter by following @NikonMEA.

SOURCE Nikon Corporation

* Read more articles by Nikon Corporation

Source: Sacbee

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Nikon D5300 Rumors, Specs, Price and Release Info: Camera Company Recently Releases Full Specs

<Nikon D5300 Cheapp>Nikon has recently come out with a full list of specs for the new D5300.

The latest model of the DX-format DSLR has 24.2 megapixels, a DX-format CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, built-in Wi-Fi capabilities, a built-in GPS, a durable light body, a 3.2-inch 1037k-dot vari-angle LCCD monitor with wide viewing angle, NAL-1 features for zoom/focus assist, and more.

It also has a full-HD 1920x1080/60p capability for movies, where selection can range from 24, 25, 30,50, and 60p. There are also 9 special effects for creative expression.

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As previously reported, Nikon Rumors reports that the Nikon D5300 is expected to be introduced before the Photo Plus show in NYC at the end of the month or the CES show in Las Vegas in January.

It is reported that this will be the first camera to get the new EXPEED 4 processor. Some other rumored specs include 24 Megapixels, 39 AF points, built-in Wi-Fi and built-in GPS.

Photography Bay reports that the D530 will be introduced as an entry-level APS-C format camera. There are no reports yet of whether or not it will have better image quality over the D5200, but it would make sense to add additional video features to the D5300.

No prices have been reported yet either, but Inferse reports that it may be priced lower than the D5200 was when it first was released.

Source: Designntrend

Monday, November 11, 2013

Spec Sheet: Nikon Df takes on Sony's tiny full-frame cameras

<Nikon D5300 Cheapimg src="">A lot of products come out each week - we don't highlight all of them, but all of them make it into The Verge Database. In Spec Sheet, a weekly series, we survey the latest product entries to keep track of the state of the art.

Nikon struck back at Sony in a major way this week with the introduction of a (relatively) small full-frame DSLR, the Df. It's an exciting new device that continues to signal the slow but inevitable shrinking down of massive DSLRs, but whether it's an appealing purchase is another question entirely. At $2,999.99 for a body and kit lens, it's no cheaper than the cameras it's trying to replace and far more expensive than Sony's competition - so is there any great appeal to it?

Little competition for cameras in its price range

At nearly $3,000, the Nikon Df is priced directly beside Nikon's own D800E and slightly beneath Canon's popular 5D Mark III. The Df can't keep up with either of those cameras - it can't even shoot video - but in reality, it's not supposed to be a direct competitor to either of them. Nikon is aiming for the pros who have long pined for a more compact full-frame camera, something with plenty of power that can also be easily carried around all day. The bad news for Nikon is: Sony's Alpha 7 does just that for a much lower price, $1,999.99 with a kit lens.

When paired side by side, Nikon's camera falls behind in a number of the more quantifiable ways. It's a little bit bigger, a little bit heavier, and has much fewer megapixels - though its megapixel count could be a good or a bad thing, depending on how concerned you are about noise and resolution. The two are pretty evenly matched on speed, with each doing a bit better than the other in a couple areas, but neither particularly trouncing the other in any of them.

The pricing of Nikon's Df makes a bit more sense when it's put beside the other half of Sony's tiny full-frame lineup, a potentially more powerful model named the Alpha 7R, but the story doesn't change much. Though the Alpha 7R costs $2,299.99 body-only, that's still nearly $450 less expensive than the Df's body costs.

Nikon's lens system makes all the difference

But there are two really big differences between the Df and the Alpha 7, both of which will ultimately be the reason the Df might find some fans. For one, the Df has an optical viewfinder with 100 percent coverage - not an electronic one like the Alpha 7 does. And more importantly, it takes lenses on Nikon's F-mount, meaning there's a wealth of glass available for it, unlike Sony's still-spartan offerings.

Df sample image from Nikon. Click for full resolution. If you want to learn more about any of the products mentioned above, all of our information on them can be found through the database box located beneath the article. For more on cameras, speakers, and just about every product around, you can check out the full Verge Database right here.

For a photographer who's long been invested in Nikon's lens system, it's easy to see the appeal of the stylish and powerful Df, so long as they're absolutely certain they don't need video. But for a new buyer, the Df doesn't put up the strongest fight with its high price. The camera is an important signal from Nikon that it's paying attention to what Sony's been doing, but its price still leaves it out of reach for most - at least for now.

A few other interesting products were added to the database this week:

Source: Theverge

Monday, November 4, 2013

Nikon D5300 hands-on review

<Nikon D5300 Discounth2>Nikon D5300 at a glance:
  • 24.2-million-pixel, APS-C-sized CMOS sensor
  • 1.037-million-dot, 3.2in, 170° LCD screen
  • Expeed 4 image processor
  • 39-point AF system with nine cross-type sensors
  • ISO 100-25,600
  • Price £730 body only

Nikon D5300 - Introduction

While the serious enthusiast is unlikely to be swayed into buying a Nikon DSLR over a Canon model purely because the Nikon camera is newer, the reality is that at the non-premium end of the market this is how some people make their buying decisions. 'Newer' must mean 'better'.

This demand for the 'new' explains why we see such short product cycles in the camera market, and why manufacturers feel the need to introduce even small advances in technology or feature sets in cameras with completely new names - rather than a 'Mark II' type of naming format.

Those familiar with Nikon's range of DSLRs may not see the sense in the company's introduction of the new D5300, especially as Nikon will maintain the D5200 alongside this model in the range - new and old together. By doing so, though, Nikon expands the number of cameras it has on offer and the number of price points it can cover, while also being able to have a model that can carry a 'New' sticker, and which introduces new features to the price band in which it will sit.

That's not to say that the Nikon D5300 isn't different to the D5200, though, as a new processor, new body design and the integration of wireless communications do genuinely bring additional benefits to the photographer.

Nikon D5300 - Design and handling

Nikon is very pleased that it has achieved a new way of constructing camera bodies, which it describes as a 'monocoque'. Instead of there being a chassis, onto which the components and the body shell are attached, the D5300 is designed to have everything screwed to the insides of the body form itself: exoskeleton, rather then the usual endoskeleton.

Image: The top of the camera houses only a few control points, keeping the layout simple and unintimidating for newcomers. A stereo microphone lives in front of the hotshoe

The D5300's body shell is also made of a new material, although Nikon won't say what that new material is - just that it is new. The upshot is that the body is less heavy than it might have been, and is 25g lighter, including the battery, than the camera it doesn't replace, the D5200.

I'm not entirely sure that when I used the camera I could appreciate the exact weight loss that has occurred, but I was able to enjoy the fact that this is truly a lightweight DSLR, of the type that we might not mind carrying all day, over the shoulder, in a bag or in a large pocket. The body is very small too, although it is balanced with a reassuringly large grip for the right hand. It seems ironic that a small and light camera should need a large grip, but I found it allowed me to be aware I was carrying the camera, and should a larger lens be attached it will help to support the forward pull of such a weight distribution.

Image: The body styling will be familiar to those used to the Nikon 5000 series, as will the standard menu. The 3.2in flip-out screen has impressive visibility

The buttons are arranged much as one might expect, with all the principal controls falling easily to the finger or thumb. The rear 3.2in LCD is very nicely bright and clear, with its 1.037-million-dot resolution. Nikon has set the viewing panel into the glass screen, so there are no gaps or internal reflections, which produces good contrast and a clear view from a quoted angled of up to 170°. I am impressed.

In live view, the screen works well when the camera is held low or high, and I found the AF quick enough and seemingly accurate. The response of the shutter in live view also seems good.

Image: Nikon has retained its choice of layouts for the rear-screen display, with text-based and graphically expressed options to suit personal preferences

Nikon D5300 - Still to test

The principal changes in this model are of the sort that will only be proved in testing, but at this stage their potential is worth pointing out. Using the higher-capacity Expeed 4 processor, Nikon claims it has been able to reduce noise in its images through the use of more complicated calculations. A related benefit is that now noise levels are lower the company is comfortable offering a higher ISO setting - the Nikon D5300 allows ratings of up to ISO 25,600. More complex calculations also provide the potential for better white balance assessment in automatic modes via a more comprehensive assessment of the scene, and a better rendition of colour overall.

Lower noise should also lead to better resolution of detail from the 24.2-million-pixel sensor, as should Nikon's decision to do without the micro-blurring effects of a low-pass (anti-aliasing) filter. Leaving the low-pass filter off the sensor has become very fashionable, and I suspect it will be a great draw for many photographers. Moiré in images created by a sensor with 24 million pixels, even an APS-C-sized sensor, is still something that is quite likely to occur, but there is also plenty of software to correct it after the event.

The other thing to note is that this model sees the introduction of a new battery cell, which Nikon says increases capacity from 500 shots to 600 compared to the cell used in the D5200. It annoys me when companies change their battery forms, but on this occasion the new cell and that used in the D5200 are interchangeable.

Obviously, I couldn't test the battery life of the camera, but we should take the increase as good news. I will also have to wait to test the Wi-Fi and GPS capabilities of this new model, but neither can be held as negative points just for their inclusion. The Wi-Fi integration means users will be able to control the camera from an Android or iOS device, and will be able to wirelessly transfer images for viewing, editing and sending while on the go.

Image: The new battery, which is backwards compatible with the D5200, offers a longer life. There is no low-pass filter on the sensor, for extra resolution

Nikon D5300 - Conclusion

It would be easy to dismiss the Nikon D5300 for being too similar to the D5200, but that really isn't the point. There is not much wrong with the D5200, and the changes that this new model brings can only make it better. Perhaps Nikon could have called it the D5200 ll, but I'm not sure it matters one bit.

The Nikon D5300 will cost around £730 body only and be available from 14 November.

Source: Amateurphotographer